Morocco Tours by Erlebnis Tours Maroc








  
  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  
  
  





     

Moroccan Culture

Introduction

Morocco is located at the crossroads of several worlds: African, Mediterranean, Christian and Islamic. From these varied influences the country has forged a distinctive culture, apparent in its arts and architecture, language, cuisine and outlook on the world.

Morocco has felt the influences of several ancient cultures. Excavations have unearthed elements of the Phoenician, Greek, Carthaginian and Roman civilizations. Christianity spread to this region in Roman times and survived the Arab invasion, but Arabic influences, which began in the 7th century, were to prove the strongest. The Arabs brought to Morocco a written language that is still the primary language of business and culture. Over the centuries Morocco received an influx of Moors and Jews, who left Spain as a result of the Christian conquest or the Inquisition. As a result of Moorish influence, Morocco developed a style of music and architecture known as Arab-Andalusian. It soon spread to the rest of Islamic North Africa. The western African influence, seen in dances and other arts, spread northward with the establishment of trade routes across the Sahara from the 10th century onwards. Among more recent cultural influences, the strongest is that of France.

Contents

Moroccan People
Religion
Folklore & Music
Feasts & Festivals
Arts & Crafts
Museums & Historical Sites
Architecture
Food & Drink

Enquiries & Booking

To enquire about or to book a personalised private cultural tour, please enter your details on the form here and click the submit button. Alternatively you may call us on +44(0)7713 615829 or send an email to enquiries@erlebnis-tours-maroc.com to discuss your itinerary and prices.

 

History: Recent History   Culture: People

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