Morocco Tours by Erlebnis Tours Maroc








  
  
  
  
  





     

Useful Information

Temperature/Weather:
Morocco is blessed with a Mediterranean climate. It is warm on the coast and arid in the interior. Morocco's wet season generally lasts from November through to March, when the rain falls mainly in the coastal areas. Morocco's mountain areas have cooler climates.

The table below shows the maximum temperatures for the main cities in Morocco and a chart showing the weather and day and night temperatures currently and for the next four days in Agadir (hover mouse over weather icon for day).

MAXIMUM TEMPERATURES in C for the main cities in Morocco

CITIES

FEB/MAR

APRIL

MAY

JUNE/JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT/NOV

DEC/JAN

 

Tangier

17.4

19.2

21.4

26.4

26.8

25.1

22.1

16.0
Casa/Rabat

19.5

20.8

22.1

26.1

26.7

25.9

23.9

18.0
Marrakech

23.0

25.7

28.7

37.8

37.5

32.9

28.1

18.3
Meknes/Fez

19.1

21.4

24.5

33.9

33.7

29.9

25.0

15.5
Agadir

22.5

23.3

24.1

26.4

26.9

26.7

25.9

20.6
Ouarzazate

23.0

26.9

30.8

39.4

38.4

33.3

27.0

16.7
Zagora

26.0

30.2

34.5

43.6

42.5

36.4

30.6

21.1

Time:
Local time is GMT.

Electricity:
Electrical current is 220 volts, 50Hz. Two-pin round plugs are in use.

Language:
Arabic is the official language, but eight other languages are also spoken including Berber, French and Spanish. English is generally understood in the tourist areas, but French is the most widely spoken.

Health:
No vaccinations are required to enter Morocco, but most travellers to Morocco will need vaccinations for hepatitis A and typhoid fever, as well as medications for travellers' diarrhoea. It is advisable to drink bottled water outside the main cities and towns, and avoid street food. Medical facilities are good in all main towns. Health insurance is essential.

Tipping:
A tip of 10 to 15% is expected in the more expensive bars and restaurants, though some establishments include a service charge. Most services are performed with the aim of getting a few dirhams, but aggressive hustling shouldn't be rewarded. Visitors should note that tips are the only income for some porters and guides.

Safety:
Morocco has one of the lowest crime rates in the world. Police and other law enforcement agents are prevalent in major cities and tourist spots.
Although there have been no recent terrorist attacks in Morocco, it is regarded as one of the countries where there is an increased threat from international terrorism and it is wise to be vigilant in places like hotels and restaurants. Violent crime is not a major problem, but there have been some incidents of theft at knifepoint in major cities and on beaches. Sensible precautions such as avoiding badly lit streets at night should be adhered to. Guides offering their services should display an official badge from the local tourist authorities. Visitors are advised to familiarise themselves with general safety procedures in the event of an earthquake as the country is prone to tremors, although usually minor ones.

Customs:
Morocco is a Muslim country and it is preferable to keep the wearing of swimsuits, shorts and other revealing clothing to the beach or poolside. On tours of mosques and other holy places, you will need to dress conservatively (i.e. no shorts or tank tops). As in any country, discretion with respect to your attire will help avoid unwanted attention. Smoking is practised widely and it is customary to offer cigarettes in social situations. Religious customs should be respected, particularly during the month of Ramadan when eating, drinking and smoking during daylight hours should be discreet as it is forbidden by the Muslim culture.

Business:
Business in Morocco has been influenced by France and therefore tends to be conducted formally, with an emphasis on politeness. Dress is formal, and women in particular should dress conservatively. Most business is conducted in French, although some English is spoken. It is best to ascertain beforehand what language the meeting will be in and arrange an interpreter as needed. Visitors are expected to be punctual, though meetings may not start on time. Moroccans are friendly and enjoy socialising; trust and friendship are important bases for business dealings and be prepared to engage in small talk. A handshake is common when arriving and departing. Women may encounter some sexism in business, although this is starting to change. Most Moroccans are Muslim and therefore one should be mindful of Islamic custom, for instance only give, receive and eat with the right hand as the left is considered unclean. Business hours are usually 8.30am to 6pm Monday to Friday, though some businesses close on Fridays.

Communications:
The international access code for Morocco is +212. The outgoing code is 00 followed by the relevant country code (e.g. 0044 for the United Kingdom). City/area codes are in use, e.g. (0)44 for Marrakech and (0)37 for Rabat. Hotels can add a hefty surcharge to their telephone bills; it is best to check before making long international calls. Two mobile GSM 900 networks cover the north of the country. Internet cafes are widely available in tourist areas.

Duty Free:
Travellers to Morocco over 18 years do not have to pay duty on 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars or 400g tobacco; 1 litre spirits and 1 litre wine; and perfume up to 5g.

Note: These amounts are not updated daily and should be used as a guideline only.

Money:
The unit of currency is the Moroccan Dirham (MAD), which is divided into 100 centimes. ATMs are available in the larger towns, but can be unreliable; currency can be exchanged at banks or official bureaux de change. Dirham cannot be obtained or exchanged outside Morocco and receipts must be retained as proof of legal currency exchange, as well as in order to re-exchange money when departing. Major credit cards are accepted in the larger shops, hotels and restaurants. Travellers cheques can be used in tourist areas.

Currency Exchange Rates

MAD 1.00 = US$ 0.12 0.06 C$ 0.14 A$ 0.15 R 0.84 0.09 NZ$ 0.17

Note: These currency exchange rates are not updated daily and should be used as a guideline only.

 

 

  

Morocco Passport & Visa Requirements:
If you hold a full passport from the UK, Ireland, any other EU country, the US, Canada, Australia or New Zealand, you require no visa to enter Morocco for up to ninety days. Note, however, that your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your date of entry, and always double check your visa requirements before departure as the situation can change. South African citizens are among those who need a visa; applications should be made to the nearest Moroccan embassy or consulate.

When entering the country, formalities are fairly straightforward, though you will have to fill in a form stating personal details, purpose of visit and your profession. In recent years, Moroccan authorities have shown an occasional reluctance to allow in those who categorize themselves as "journalist"; an alternative profession on the form might be wise.

Note: Passport and visa requirements are liable to change at short notice. Travellers are advised to check their entry requirements with their embassy or consulate.
 

Moroccan Culture: Food & Drink   Glossary

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